Having A Hoot At Akiba Fukurou Owl Cafe in Akihabara

“… fukuro, the symbol of the owl is a lucky charm to welcome good fortune. The word fukuro is also synonym for “fukurou” in Japanese which means protection from hardship or a lack of hardship or trouble. “Fu” meaning no, and “kurou” meaning hardship.”


I loved animals ever since I could remember. Call it the influence of Western culture where I see friendly talking animals but all my life, I’ve never been afraid of animals. So when during my research for my Tokyo trip I found out that there was an owl cafe, I knew I had to go there. I MUST GO THERE. I love fowls and birds. My family has around 5 parrots and has experience raising quite a few birds already but I’ve never held an owl before.

Good thing my friend wasn’t creeped out by these gentle big-eyed wonder so WOOT WOOT, we were going to Akiba Fukurou Owl Cafe. Akiba because it is located right in Akihabara district (which is turning out to be my almost favorite place in Tokyo. I just LOVE this place).



Sure it may have that cafe word attached to its name but trust me when I say that they offer no food or drink here. What Akiba Fukurou offers instead is food for the soul. Who knew that spending quality time with around 30 owls can give you such tranquility and peace? With only classical music playing and the gentle voices of the owl trainers and owners, you just can’t help but sit back and relax with the owls.

But there are guidelines and rules to follow. You cannot just fondle or yell at the birds. You also have to respect them and your fellow “owl-mates”. Even reserving a coveted spot in the owl cafe is already a battlefield so I’d like to make things easier for you. Entrance fee is 1,500 yen by the way so bring cash. Presenting…



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Cayoneering Badian

Should the Canyoneering In Badian, Cebu Be Suspended?

Recently I saw this article that mentioned that Canyoneering in Badian, Cebu will be suspended soon because of the recent accidents that have happened to tourists. For those unfamiliar with canyoneering, it’s an adrenaline-pumping activity for daredevils that involves walking, climbing, jumping (LOTS of it), more walking, swimming and slipping. And for Badian, you have to traverse the trail starting with a 20-foot waterfall jump and ending it with a 35-ft one.


I can be a daredevil sometimes because I love crazy rollercoasters and I have climbed grade 3 mountains before but I am really not keen on activities that have a high percentage of risk (on my life). I need to know if I am safe at all times when doing the activity. Just like a rollercoaster, I tend to ask questions such as what is the safety history of this rollercoaster? Are safety equipment in place when performing the activity? What precautions should I consider?

Yes I am a worry wart but a responsible one I’d like to think so.

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12 Things We Wished We Knew Before Going To Tokyo

It’s the middle of May and since my last post, I’ve traveled to 2 countries – Japan and Thailand thus my lack of updates. My mind was still savoring the experiences. You know how it feels right? They do say that when you travel, leave only footprints and take only memories. We’re all here for responsible traveling!

Now presenting the second post of my Things We Wish We Knew series (check out Korea here). In this series, I stumble, try new and odd experiences and make mistakes for you so you guys don’t have to go through it (though feel free to make your own mistakes and learnings and share them here as well). I want to save you guys the trouble and hassle that goes with traveling.


12 Things We Wished We Knew Before Going To Tokyo

          ESTABLISHED 1856


1. Reserve the Best restaurants in advance (LIKE 3 MONTHS)

My Best Sushi Meal at Kyubey <3
Foodies would know that Tokyo has the most Michelin starred restaurants in the world. They also have the cheapest and most expensive ones in Tokyo. But it is VERY TRICKY to get a seat/reservation because Tokyo as a concrete jungle, only has limited space and so do their restaurants. It is cramped and there is only limited seating. You have to reserve 2 months AT LEAST to get a seat (I would suggest 3 months in advance to be sure) at the top restaurants. Now I didn’t follow this advice and lost the chance to eat at the best sushi restaurant at Sushi Saito. I did thankfully get a reservation at Kyubey because they had a lot of branches and Nakajima does not even accept reservations. For those that do not accept reservations, eat a light meal before going to you won’t starve while waiting through the LONG LINES.

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